Search results

Jump to navigation Jump to search
  • Note: 1 " Trenail " and the French term cheville apply specifically to a hardwood pin. Note: 2 The French term goujon is used only when the pin is of metal.
    448 bytes (63 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: 1 The French term boulon is also used for the combination of a nut and bolt. Note: 2 The term set screw and the French term vis calante are used when the threaded part continues as far as the he
    638 bytes (105 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: 2 The term azimut in French is used when the point of observation is a fixed point and the position of The term relevement in French is used mainly when the point of observation is on a floating or moored ves
    857 bytes (135 words) - 23:58, 24 February 2009
  • ...ing to whether they are of natural origin or produced by crushing, e.g. in French between pierre roulee and pierre cassee and between sable de riviere and sa
    1,004 bytes (148 words) - 00:31, 25 February 2009
  • ...called a Beacon. This may be lighted (2-5-005) or unlighted (2-6-030). The French term Balise is generally used to describe an unlighted beacon. Note 3: In French, the term Amer Remarquable is applied to a navigation mark which is particu
    898 bytes (138 words) - 10:02, 1 March 2009
  • ...t between interacting mechanical parts resulting from looseness. Note:: In French "backlash" and "looseness" are the word "jeu."
    337 bytes (40 words) - 00:21, 25 February 2009
  • One cycle of vertical motion of the sea surface. Note: In French a very sharp wave is called a lame.
    266 bytes (37 words) - 00:34, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, the term bouee a carillon is applied to a buoy bearing a group of bells.
    289 bytes (43 words) - 00:16, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French such a formation when totally submerged is called a roche.
    357 bytes (48 words) - 23:58, 24 February 2009
  • Note: The French term etage does not apply to the space between the ground floor and the fir
    363 bytes (50 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French a distinction is made between siliceous silt (silt) and organic silt (limon
    362 bytes (47 words) - 00:34, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term entretoise means more specifically a short member placed between two b
    405 bytes (51 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French a distinction is made between cric, a screw jack, and verin, a hydraulic ja
    357 bytes (52 words) - 00:35, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term for a window sill is appui.
    326 bytes (47 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, the term cosse refers to any device that enables a battery lead to be fixe
    364 bytes (53 words) - 00:25, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, the term Bouee a Carillon is applied to a buoy bearing a group of bells.
    365 bytes (55 words) - 10:02, 1 March 2009
  • Note: In French the term puissance installee refers also to the total load that can be conn
    418 bytes (62 words) - 00:27, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French the phenomenon is called flambage and the resultant is called flambement.
    374 bytes (51 words) - 00:34, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French an oscillation of the swell is called a lame.
    361 bytes (54 words) - 23:59, 24 February 2009
  • Note: The German term Sturz and the French term linteau can also apply to a brick arch construction used instead of a
    405 bytes (60 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: A battery used in this way is called in French batterie flottante.
    412 bytes (59 words) - 13:02, 25 March 2009
  • Note: The French term alimentation regulee refers to a stabilised power supply unit in which
    456 bytes (63 words) - 00:26, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term vis is also used for a bolt (7-2-340).
    421 bytes (66 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French and in German a distinction is made between remorquage, Schleppen for towin
    399 bytes (58 words) - 00:35, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, the term Feu de Rive is commonly used for a channel light on a fixed suppo
    375 bytes (58 words) - 10:02, 1 March 2009
  • Note: The French term enrochements and the German term Steinschuttung also apply to stones u
    435 bytes (60 words) - 00:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term prise (de courant) is often used for either of the component parts (6-
    473 bytes (65 words) - 00:27, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, a lighted coastal mark is called Feu de Jalonnement (2-5-055).
    459 bytes (66 words) - 10:02, 1 March 2009
  • Note: The terms Lens Clock and, in French, Machine de Rotation a Poids refer to such a mechanism when driven by a fal
    462 bytes (68 words) - 10:01, 1 March 2009
  • Note: The French term cale denotes a gently sloping area on which a landing can be made.
    412 bytes (61 words) - 00:29, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term estacade applies to a small platform intended to assist in handling a
    420 bytes (59 words) - 00:29, 25 February 2009
  • Note 1: Formerly Quantity of Illumination and, in French, Quantite d'Eclairement.
    471 bytes (64 words) - 10:00, 1 March 2009
  • Note: The terms "Moteur" and "Corps" in French, and "Antrieb" in German apply to any form of sound emitter.
    454 bytes (65 words) - 00:16, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The complement to unity of the liquidity index is called in French indice de consistance, and in German Konsistenzzahl.
    461 bytes (62 words) - 00:34, 25 February 2009
  • ...ould be provided in the three major languages English, French and Spanish. French translations of Dictionary terms have been provided for x definitions while
    2 KB (237 words) - 08:13, 26 October 2017
  • Note: The French term epi and the German term Buhne are also used for structures extending i
    480 bytes (69 words) - 00:29, 25 February 2009
  • Note: Formerly Luminous Emittance and, in French, Emittance Lumineuse.
    500 bytes (73 words) - 10:00, 1 March 2009
  • Note: 2 In French a recorder for sound signals is called a magnetophone and a recorder for vi
    459 bytes (66 words) - 23:58, 24 February 2009
  • Note: 2 The term shingle in French is used for imitations of shingles in various materials other than in wood,
    457 bytes (71 words) - 00:31, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The terms Tube Fluorescent in French, and, in German, Leuchtstoffsroehre and Fluoreszenzroehre are also used, pa
    559 bytes (77 words) - 10:01, 1 March 2009
  • Note 2: The French term Economiseur is used for such apparatus when the light is a gas or vapo
    478 bytes (70 words) - 10:01, 1 March 2009
  • Note: 2 In French the definition of the term "facteur de duree" is more restrictive than the
    517 bytes (75 words) - 00:21, 25 February 2009
  • Note: For the French and German terms applicable, see 2-3-210 and 2-3-215.
    522 bytes (81 words) - 10:01, 1 March 2009
  • Note: The terms Lampe de Projection in French and Projection Lamp (U.S.A.) refer more specifically to a lamp intended for
    587 bytes (94 words) - 10:01, 1 March 2009
  • ...ould be provided in the three major languages English, French and Spanish. French translations of Dictionary terms have been provided for 5 definitions while
    2 KB (280 words) - 13:18, 29 November 2018
  • Note:: The French word "commande" is generally used to mean control.
    567 bytes (80 words) - 00:21, 25 February 2009
  • [[Category:French]]
    626 bytes (88 words) - 10:36, 8 October 2018
  • Note: 2 Formerly irradiation in English and irradiation in French.
    551 bytes (80 words) - 23:58, 24 February 2009
  • Note: A Flanged Cap (Culot a Ailettes in French; Flanschsockel in German) is a particular type of pre-focus cap.
    598 bytes (90 words) - 10:01, 1 March 2009
  • The French term depot de bouees means a small buoy yard with no buoy tender attached.
    611 bytes (89 words) - 11:13, 15 February 2009

View (previous 50 | next 50) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)