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  • Note: 1 " Trenail " and the French term cheville apply specifically to a hardwood pin. Note: 2 The French term goujon is used only when the pin is of metal.
    448 bytes (63 words) - 01:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: 1 The French term boulon is also used for the combination of a nut and bolt. Note: 2 The term set screw and the French term vis calante are used when the threaded part continues as far as the he
    638 bytes (105 words) - 01:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: 2 The term azimut in French is used when the point of observation is a fixed point and the position of The term relevement in French is used mainly when the point of observation is on a floating or moored ves
    857 bytes (135 words) - 00:58, 25 February 2009
  • ...ing to whether they are of natural origin or produced by crushing, e.g. in French between pierre roulee and pierre cassee and between sable de riviere and sa
    1,004 bytes (148 words) - 01:31, 25 February 2009
  • ...called a Beacon. This may be lighted (2-5-005) or unlighted (2-6-030). The French term Balise is generally used to describe an unlighted beacon. Note 3: In French, the term Amer Remarquable is applied to a navigation mark which is particu
    898 bytes (138 words) - 11:02, 1 March 2009
  • ...t between interacting mechanical parts resulting from looseness. Note:: In French "backlash" and "looseness" are the word "jeu."
    337 bytes (40 words) - 01:21, 25 February 2009
  • One cycle of vertical motion of the sea surface. Note: In French a very sharp wave is called a lame.
    266 bytes (37 words) - 01:34, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, the term bouee a carillon is applied to a buoy bearing a group of bells.
    289 bytes (43 words) - 01:16, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French such a formation when totally submerged is called a roche.
    357 bytes (48 words) - 00:58, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term etage does not apply to the space between the ground floor and the fir
    363 bytes (50 words) - 01:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French a distinction is made between siliceous silt (silt) and organic silt (limon
    362 bytes (47 words) - 01:34, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term entretoise means more specifically a short member placed between two b
    405 bytes (51 words) - 01:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French a distinction is made between cric, a screw jack, and verin, a hydraulic ja
    357 bytes (52 words) - 01:35, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The French term for a window sill is appui.
    326 bytes (47 words) - 01:30, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, the term cosse refers to any device that enables a battery lead to be fixe
    364 bytes (53 words) - 01:25, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French, the term Bouee a Carillon is applied to a buoy bearing a group of bells.
    365 bytes (55 words) - 11:02, 1 March 2009
  • Note: In French the term puissance installee refers also to the total load that can be conn
    418 bytes (62 words) - 01:27, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French an oscillation of the swell is called a lame.
    361 bytes (54 words) - 00:59, 25 February 2009
  • Note: In French the phenomenon is called flambage and the resultant is called flambement.
    374 bytes (51 words) - 01:34, 25 February 2009
  • Note: The German term Sturz and the French term linteau can also apply to a brick arch construction used instead of a
    405 bytes (60 words) - 01:30, 25 February 2009

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